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science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and then not messages that are speaking to a far broader size
campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sor
off the race to the top, let's hire 100,000 new math and science teachers who are actually trained in math and science. let's continue to focus on early childhood education, makes a big difference for kids who are particularly low income. part of the race to the top let's figure out what are the dropout factors out there. a couple thousand schools where we know they are really underperforming and let's transform those schools. >> in the state of the union you said i'm putting you on notices, colleges, if you don't reduce this tuition, you don't see your funding dropped. is there any evidence that they have done anything to changed? that they have listened to that threat? >> there are some schools that we have. the biggest problem that we have with tuition, especially at public universities, is state legislatures have been shifting priorities, and what we've said to state legislatures is you've got to do your part and prioritize this because how well your state does is going to depend on how good -- how well your work force is educated, but what we've also seen is schools starting t
lab. the author of the sushi economy pulls the curtain that of the operatives that use social science to determine the outcome of elections. >> host: well, sasha this is a provocative and timely look as we are weeks away from the election. i want to know how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i covered campaigns beginning in philadelphia, so i was paying more attention to sort of tactics and techniques in the physical world of campaigns just because in the big city so much attention was being paid to the vote counted and precinct targeted so i talked to people that were making tv ads and i was always shocked as i think anybody that spent time on the campaigns is that most people couldn't explain to me why they did anything that they were doing. how do you know that and why do you do that and at some point they did it because the it always done it that we were they had some sort of a rule that wasn't based on any research. so some sort of skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and
all the furniture from the science wing. that'd show 'em. anna belle laughed her head-back laugh. learning happens in many different ways, i'm just saying. but even something this silly could get out of hand, and she knew it. the science teachers, especially, that was where scores most needed to come up. anna belle looked to the ceiling. after 15 years as an administrator, she knew ms. kaiser's kind. ms. kaiser was young, ms. kaiser had time and energy to spare and apparently tables too. [laughter] anna belle had been like ms. kaiser once, in another life, it seemed. can you tell carmen to lasso those teachers up? i told them, do not move furniture. then she hurried the talk along. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction, and after that there was still the matter of the squirrel eating through i.t. cables to address. after the meeting anna belle made her rounds. she came across a teacher agonizing over whether to shut down his fish tank. no be, anna belle told him, there's a living thing in there -- [laughter] so this next passage involves something that shouldn't ever hav
, but wt i've proposed moving forward, building off of the race to the top, let's hire new math and science teachers who are trained in math and science without being thrown i the classroom without the eparioey. focus on early childhood education. part of our race to the top is let's figure out what are the dropout factories out there. some schools are really underperforming. let' transform tho schools. and all tseitont we have to do is combine creativity and evidence-based approaches. so let's not use ideology. let's figure out what works and combine that with resources. and this is big argument and big difference that i'ot gnoomney in this election. they talk a good game about reform, but when you actually look at budgets, they're talking about slashing our investment education by 20, 25%. we've already seen 300,000 teachers that have been fired ross the country, and a a consequence class sizes have gone up by 5%. and when you talk with a teacher -- i was meeting wita couple of teachers in las vegas -- they said they've got 42 kids in a class, some of them sitting on floor. it takes a cou
science to that, as well, when i was governor. two, they worked on a statewide curriculum. it took a number of years, but they had a series of elements they felt students needed to learn. three, they would evaluate annually the success of various schools. all the schools actually. and if a school consistently fell below a passing grade, then the state had the capacity to step in, take over the school, remove its leadership, and actually remove elements of the union contract if they believed those elements interfered with the education of a child. beyond that, i had the chance not just to have this, if you will, the stick if you can't pass the graduation exam you can't graduate, i also worked to put in place a carrot, an incentive. while i was governor, we passed legislation that said that if you took the exam to graduate and you were among the top quarter in your high school in terms of the grade you got on that exam, then you were entitled to the john and an about a gail adams scholarship, which was four years tuition free at any massachusetts public institution of higher learning
% registered democrats. but only 14% are republican. social science is only 6%. >> 70 2% self identify as liberal. which is a big disparity between them and the general public. john: you were a junior when obama was elected? >> it was light a little of the colt it happened across the nation. john: not just the attitude but there are actual space -- speech restriction red light, yellow light and this university was demoted? >> to policies unc maintains which is sexual-harassment if you attended college and other than unc it bans all sexually explicit jokes. john: david, you have a copy what did you find? >> sexually explicit jokes jokes, books, it is different -- difficult to control how you look at someone. policy in the residence halls to avoid using the returners spoken word in the way that offends. that is a rage asleep fraud. a picture of mitt romney would offend 70%. [laughter] john: you may not explicitly or implicitly asked for sex. john: then how do you get there? [laughter] is it automatically rate? >> these policies are not well thought out. this is what you get to with burea
sophisticated mathematics and the science behind meteorology. we used data from many sources - data coming from the national weather service, data coming from farms - to predict not just the weather, but how that weather impacts farms. > > lloyd, tell me, what exactly does this do? what does this information do for, say, the farmer? > > well, instead of getting a generic and fairly vague weather forecast, we can provide a detailed forecast of when and where it might rain tomorrow on the farm, and more importantly, how that would affect the operations. so when i talk to farmers, one of the things that they tell me is a big challenge, especially in the drought-stricken season, is irrigation. they want to be much more efficient at using water, and they want to schedule that ahead of time. that's dependent on where and when it will rain tomorrow - the temperature, the humidity. the idea is that we not only predict the weather, but we can predict the schedule of the irrigation, where and when the water would need to be applied. > > is this being rolled out now, being put into use? > > well, we've ac
? >> sam? >> it's a cumulus cloud. >> you have to try the science department. >>> this controversial headline, talking about a mom gene. there's some new research that says that could be something that actually gets that some women are better suited to give birth and be mothers. >> i have mom jeans. >> i'm wearing them now. cue the music. >>> get ready, everybody. trash to treasure in the house. it was a staple on "gaa." welcome to "gma" with this anchor showdown, like we've never done before. going to show you how to transform flea market bargains into stunning showpieces, we hope. yeah. we'll do our best, lara. >> that would be good of you. >> you might understand -- >> i'm lowering expectations, as the presidential nominees are both doing. >>> now, to the shocking murder mystery out of hollywood, that ended up with an up-and-coming tv actor dead. johnny lewis and officials say he went on a violent rampage, allegedly killing his landlady and then himself. was a designer drug behind all of it? abc's david wright has the latest from los angeles. david? >> reporter: that's the working
in math and science. he was even the science student of the year at the university of illinois. but after his adoptive mother passed away, ellis oon dropped t of school and headed to california with little money in his pocket. his skills were quickly recognized. he helped build the first ibm compatible mainframe system. in 1977, he and two of his colleagues broke off and started a company that would eventually become oracle. ellison took the company public in 1986, already a billion-dollar enterprise. now a $100 billion company, his mystique has grown as a billionaire who lives on the edge. he's made shareholders nervous while suffering body blows from mountain biking and surfing. he won a yacht race in sidney overcoming hurricane-strength winds that sank five competitors and drowned six participants. some have speculated he's the inspiration for the tony stark character in "the iron man" films, with ellison even making a cameo in the most recent sequel. ellison's passion for boating it now focused on the america's cup competition. >> this sis extreme sailing. >> he's the principle suppor
. meet tom, an appraiser for 26 years. he said it's part art, part science. >> what kind of improvements have you made to your home in the recent past? >> a lot. >> reporter: remember that out of control office? now, all business. the cluttered kitchen, cleaned up. and the old facet, updated. and the living room, now spare. the old set, replaced with state of the art. but could those little changes really pay off? remember, the last appraisal came in at $190,000. the new appraisal? >> oh, good. >> that's a lot better. >> reporter: $214,000. a $24,000 increase. >>> and they were such good sports, they did everything on that seven-page to-do list. and it paid off. remember, we spent $1600. for every dollar they spent they got $15 back on that appraisal. so it's a good lesson. the first appraisal, not the final word. the important thing here, don't panic. >> and what about prospective buyers? >> the house is still for sale, but they have people coming over and importantly coming back for a second look. >> good luck to them and thank you so much sharyn. >>> and coming up. are we looking at a
called those science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> they're closer to becoming reality than you think. abc's jim avila has taken one for a test drive. >> reporter: you've seen this, cars that slam on the brakes before you hit a pole. but here's something you have never seen. the car of the future. making the driver totally unnecessary. no hands. google's working on one. and the federal government is sponsoring a field test in ann arbor, michigan. with cars that automatically swerve past accidents and alert you to oncoming hazards. now, this at general motors test track. i sat in the driver's seat when this car stayed in its lane. it stopped on its own when a car driving 30 miles an hour slower, pulled in front of us. >> we can see the day when cars avoid collisions. >> reporter: it's on a dream, since george jetson sat in his flying car. >> the vehicle can take complete control and take you to your destination in comfort and safety and security. >> reporter: this prototype used radar, cameras and gps to drive itself. feet off the pedals. can look away. don't do this at home. at
's hire 100,000 new math and science teachers. let's continue to focus on early childhood education, makes a big difference particularly for kids who are low income. part of our race to the top, one of the dropout factories out there, a couple of thousand schools where we know they are really underperforming and let's transform those schools. >> in your state of the union, you said i'm putting you on notice, colleges, if you don't refuse this tuition, you're going to see your funding drop. do you see any indication of change, that they have listened to that threat? >> the biggest problem we have with tuition, especially public universities is that state legislators have been shifting priorities. you've got to do your part and prioritize this, how well your state does is going to depend on how well your workforce is educated. but what we have also seen is schools starting to do something about costs. >> and one more note, governor romney mentioned to you, brian, that he supports pay for performance for teachers and he also supports income situations. >> all of this brings us to the woman wh
way. and there's a great quote on this, you have to build the science of human relationships. and it is a science. maybe somebody should talk to the president and say, look, this is a scice tmaster. i do think, mika,his afedernance at home and abroad. i do think there is too much anecdotal evidence. talked about the senate democratic caucus and iust read thesila98 rounds of golf. anybody play golf with the guy? and nobody. >> nobody. because he doesn't -- he doesn't do the -- >> you think he should be having deep and intense meetings with nenyah >> tce6: the morning, i don't know if you think i'm a 3-year-old, but i'm not even going to waste my breath at 6:18 in the morning answering these false connections. but i will tell you what he needs to do. >>t's also aalse argument. >> it's not a false argunt, mi it's a matter of history. >> when he totally trumps romney completely in that. >> can i ask you a question? >> no. >> i'm going to ask you a question. hothn- >> you want to hear? >> i think this is how we help the middle east is i think we need to get somof these pills from
university is helping a program by awarding grant money to baltimore elementary schools. the national science foundation will award the funds over a five-year period and partnership with the schools. it will help 1300 students in grades three through five improve science and math education. here is sarah caldwell and traffic pulse 11. >> there is a busy ride out there. if you're traveling in the next few minutes, delays forming on southbound 795. they form from white marsh and continue down to the beltway. reid 7, philadelphia road and ridge road, watch for an accident in rosedale. 22 miles per hour on the west side outer loop. eastbound i-70 from 32 all way towards 29, expect delays. another one coming in on westbound 100 and oakwood road, creating a big backup approaching route 10. six miles per hour there. pretty heavy south of this exit. south of the beltway or these, these delays continue from white marsh down to the 895 split. tony, over to you. >> we are off to a nice start. plenty of sunshine out there. winds have shifted to the southwest. 48 in jarrettsville. you want to take in ligh
of engineering and applied science. emma i have been at this university for three years we have a strong community it doesn't surprise me that people who did not know him came out to find him and support the effort ... madulla was from hyde park new york. his family says the harbor wasnt the type of place he would normally visit because hes more of an indoors person. a body was pulled from lake michigan this morning near navy pier. marine units pulled the body just after eight o'clock this morning. workers for a boat cleaning service spotted the body just north of the pier. police don't have an identification. they aren't saying if it's a man or a woman. schaumburg police are seeking we are here in arlington heights when the tylenol mystery connection was first made ... >>helen jensen was the first to see ... this nurse spoke to victims' families and went to the home of one of the victims and found that tainted tylenol ... >>because they told me that they all took tylenol i counted those capsules ... she sounded the alarm but law enforcement had their doubts ... they said i couldn't
necessary to make a bomb. >> i rance president says the nuclear program is just advancing science their program is moving quickly doubling its capacity to produce 20 percent enriched uranium over the summer. there will be a media frenzy tomorrow at a house in roseville michigan just outside of detroit when authorities dig into a driveway in search of potential schuman remains. human remains. ground penetrating radar spotted an anomaly something out of the ordinary after police received what they believe to be a credible source. but they are skeptical that the remains of their belonged to hoffa. a change in this year's flu vaccine that you really should know about. 80 years of chicago history captured by three generations of photographers. what are these flowers going to turn into? >> brad is a special education teacher and conducts class were ever there is a lesson to be taught. michael for the kids i am dealing with is i would like to help them become as independent as possible. if this freshman is an example, it's working. >> i like him because he was a good teacher and he he
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
striking for their kids. >> how about science deniers. the science is in. you have to get that in. birther three is critical for learning. it is a funding issue. if you don't have money for kids until they are six years old to start kinder garden, you have missed that -- those critical brain development years. we are starting to fund public education too late. >> i want to unpack one thing pedro said so people understand. when we say integration is off the table in public schools, what we are talking about is that justice roberts ruled in 2007 in the seattle school's decision that schools could not take race into a factor at all to integrate public schools. that's where brown ended and so i just think as a big point, not that we have all the time in the world for it but part of these reform issues are also about reforming the courts. there are certain decisions we talk a lot about in money and politics. this area of integration is something that is going to come from reforming. >> i have been so revved up since education nation. we are doing a little education every week. you guys are alre
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with the citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] and waiting in line. i don't have to leave my desk and get up and go to the post office anymore. [ male announcer ] with stamps.com, you can print real u.s. postage for all your letters and packages. it gives you the exact amount of postage you need the instant you need it. can you print only stamps? no. first class. priority mail. certified. international. and the mailman picks it up. i don't leave the shop anymore. [ male announcer ] get a 4-week trial plus $100 in extras including postage
the social science dictum that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. as a wire service guy, i am not in the prognostication business, but i feel fairly safe going out on a limb in a couple of things today. eight months ago, in the state of the union speech, obama issued an appeal to congress to spend more federal money on construction projects that would generate jobs. what he said was, take the money we are no longer spending at war. use half of the to pay down our debt. use the rest to do some nation building right here at home. we pointed out in a fact check that night the fallacy of that idea. the idea that some kind of budget surplus is going to be created when you stop the wars is fiscal fiction. those wars have been primarily financed by borrowing. if you stop the wars, you do not have new money, you just have less debt being added. it does not treat a pool of ready cash. on top of that, the supposed savings of this supposed peace dividend is inflated because it is based on spending numbers that are extrapolated into the future that would come from the height of the
they build up the man immediately. >> excess demand for the platform is an early science and success and challenge as opposed to total failure. it is hard to know how large scale the test needs to be. large school districts, very large ones have a lot of students. doesn't take too many large school districts to be able to have a sufficiently sized test bed to do this rapidly. and to overcome that. we will find school systems willing to join. one avenue is the league of innovative schools and large school districts. this will be different but perhaps those schools signal interest and innovation and general technology to become part of the test bed to start to look and i hope this is something we can overcome but it will require some skill if we get a lot of excitement. >> could everyone join me in thanking our excellent offers an excellent panel. >> now the keynote speaker at the brookings institution forum. education secretary arne duncan talks about progress in k-12 education and his reform effort. following his remarks, questions from the audience. >> by the end of this decade to h
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> i've been warning you for months, there is an economic storm coming our way from europe and you need to take cover. i've given you reasons why. i pointed my finger at politicians who aren't doing enough to shelter you. i argued with economists, i even blamed you for your part in this. after all that, i got to give you some props. all you see is sunshine and blue skies ahead. despite those threatening thunder clou thunderclouds out of europe, the inconsistent monthly jobs report and the ongoing scorched earth politics in washington, apparently you are feeling pretty good. consumer confidence jumped in september. take a look at that, by nine points. optimism about the jobs market drove that increase despite the fact we only added 96,000 jobs last month. let's see what we do when we get the jobs numbers on friday. not so bad, 96,000 jobs. never mind this week's forecast for higher inflation. that's not bothering you. or the puny increase that
government president -- wow -- adam rotti who is studying political science. >> all right. are you ready? >> question one. >> yes. >> which of the following is not a college mascot? "a," the fighting pickle? "b" -- >> keep going. keep going. >> banana slug, the leafy sea dragons or the trolls? >> go. >> the leafy thing. >> the leafy sea dragon. university of georgia school of the arts. while the trolls are from trinity college. question two. in the climactic scene in the film "rudy," what football team is notre dame playing when rudy finally gets in the game? university of southern california? georgia tech? university of michigan? or "d," university of tennessee? >> get it right. >> come on, you're on your own. >> michigan. >> not university of michigan. what do you think? >> georgia tech? >> georgia tech. okay. next question. listen up. on the periodic table of elements, the symbols "k" and "h" each stand for what? is it -- >> oh, oh! >> tennessee. >> natural resources. >> helium, carbon and mercury, potassium and hydrogen or krypton and hydrogen? >> potassium and hydrogen. >> it's pota
to other developed countries. the u.s. ranks 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in math. how to fix the education system was front and center in chicago this month as teachers walked off the job over issues of longer school days, merit pay and teacher evaluations. education reform is an issue in the presidential campaign. president obama and his republican challenger, mitt romney, both favor expanding charter schools, support standardized tests and want more accountability from teachers and principals. but the two men have significant disagreements. >> i think some of the main differences between governor romney and president obama when it comes to education come in the area of school choice. governor romney sees a really robust rule for school choice and school improvement whereas president obama like a lot of democrats has been skeptical of vouchers. >> reporter: romney supports taking federal dollars for educating special needs and low income families, known as title i funds and giving them directly to parents in the form of vouchers. although romney avoids using that word. >> fo
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> at least 30 people are dead across iraq. the muslim community seems to be part the. >> baghdad's shiite dominated government blames the recent attacks on sunni insurgents with al qaeda ties. two americans, one civilian are dead. it happened at a temporary checkpoint 0er79ed by coalition troops west of kabul. three afghan soldiers also died in the clash that officials say may have been provoked by insurgent fire. there has been a rise of militant suicide attacks. suicide attacks are a common tactic for the taliban. in an exclusive interview with cnn, anna koren talks to a would-be suicide bomber. >> this man believed he was carrying out god's will when he carried out an attack in kandahar province. he said he agreed to wear a suicide vest and kill as many people as possible. it's a special feeling that comes to you when you are ready for a suicide attack. no one can stop you, no one could stop me, that is except the law. when police arrested him five months ago in jalalabad, during the planning of the attack. he'
thousand dollars and i will pay my teachers $75,000 a year too. come on. this is not rocket science. it is hard political work. the political will to meet the needs of children whose needs have never been matched is hard. >> come in. >> richard's argument is frustrating and personal honestly because their statistical likelihood of graduating high school would be less than 50% and we can say that is okay and we are making progress. that is not okay. we have to take a totally different look at what we're doing in public education and rethink it and say how the we take what we found in small isolated pockets and figure out how to get them to millions of kids who need them and that is a massive challenge. none of us are underestimating the size of this challenge. i am trying to argue we have indications of what those elements are. in new york city public schools from k-12 the personal the likelihood of me graduating with a diploma was 5%. five% of kids graduated special-education students from new york city public schools and i went on to graduate from high school and had great teachers
on facebook. we're back in one-half hour with another update. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ >>> 7:30 now on a tuesday morning, september 25th, 2012. nice morning here in the northeast. meanwhile inside studio 1a time for the old wind machine, but enough about savannah. we have got -- >> oh, you did not! >> we've got day two of "ask away today." that's the wind machine filled with questions. i'm going to jump in there in a couple minutes, pick a couple out and quiz my companions. >> i've got a question for. why are you so mean? >> i'm not mean. >> what's wrong with you? >> the nfl refs have me on the edge. i'm matt lauer along with savannah guthrie. also ahead, your interview with the president. >> we talked about education and the problems facing our nation's schools and al
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> there ar lot of things that are right in the world today. it is a friday. the refs are back at work in the nfl. and on this last day of the third quarter the dow and s&p ontrack for the best monthly gain since june. this is the fourth month in a row. the big boy this morning the k shields and mainstay investments subsidiaries of new york life celebrating a recent launch of the mainstay municipal opportunities fund. with the nasdaq, starbucks celebrating a third anniversary. the instant coffee and recent launch of its system for at home brewing which by all accounts is getting off to a good start. >> yes. a big leadership conference coming up at starbucks. i believe in howard schultz. came on our show. i like this product. i like the fact europe might be turning. mostly i like the fact that when he gave one of these big meetings in new orleans a couple years ago, to get united states jump-started, it worked. i think he's got a clear bet. i like starbucks. >> you mentioned the possibility of europe turning. t
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> tomorrow, a double dose. >>> finally today, my observation on savers versus spenders. it is good news, as we spoke about earlier, that we are seeing a generational shift happening on the heels of the financial cry sisisis. younger people are spending less. the unintended consequences of all of the free money and stimulus from the federal reserve. these young savers are being hurt by artificially low interest rates. i've always been a big saver. my mother drilled into me the dangers of leaving yourself vulnerable if life throws you a curveball like losing your job or god forbid an illness. i have always been one to save first and spend later. no doubt about it. that's who i am. today's youngsters have learned from their parents to do the same after witnessing job cuts and foreclosed homes firsthand. as the fed keeps pumping money to save the economic recovery and makes these promises to keep rates at rock bottom levels until at least 2015, those people are losing money, just by keeping it in ro
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. look! she wears the scarlet markings! [ man ] out! your kind is not welcome here! nor your odd predilections! miracle whip is tangy and sweet, not odd. [ man ] it's evil! if you'd try it, you'd know. she speaketh the truth! [ crowd gasps ] [ woman ] reverend? ♪ can i have some? ♪ >>> another big indication of why republicans should be worried. the indiana senate race is in play for a seat held by senator richard lugar since 1977. the democratic candidate is joe donly. he leads by three points in the internal poll conducted by global strategy group. now mower dock defeated richard lugar in a primary and made clear he had no inter
, you know, disbelieving in science thing, but really, at this point to say no, no, no, all these polls, except rasmussen, are faulty because they oversample-- somes is just sad. >> this is the disavow of reality that seems to be permeating the romney campaign and joe scarborough highlighted this morning. i will highlight it today, this afternoon. an op-ed in the "wall street journal" by jason riley that says mr. romney would do better to focus more on reducinged his unforced errors and less on the fourth estate's political bias if whining about the liberal media was a winning strategy for republicans newt gingrich would be the nominee. hugo, i will call your attention -- >> liberal media. >> new york times hugo lingren, this i think is really -- i like this because it references stink bombs also. the ap quoting michael mcdonald of george mason university which tracks early voting saying if you wait until the election prior to the election to release your stink bomb you've lost coloradans. if you've got the game changer you have to do that soon. >> i agree with that. look, the romney ca
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